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Lymphoid Neoplasia Associated with the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS): The New York University Medical Center Experience with 105 Patients (1981-1986)

DANIEL M. KNOWLES, M.D.; GLENN A. CHAMULAK, M.D.; MILAYNA SUBAR, M.D.; JEROME S. BURKE, M.D.; MARGARET DUGAN, M.D.; JAMES WERNZ, M.D.; CHRYSTIA SLYWOTZKY, M.D.; PIERGIUSEPPE PELICCI, M.D.; RICCARDO DALLA-FAVERA, M.D.; and BRUCE RAPHAEL, M.D.
[+] Article and Author Information

Grant support: in part by NIH grants EY06337 (DMK), CA37295 (RDF), Cancer Center Care Support Grant CA16087 and by grants from the American Cancer Society (DMK), the New York State AIDS Institute (DMK) and the Bernard and Frances Laterman Project Chai Philanthropic Trust (DMK, RDF). Riccardo Dalla-Favera, M.D., is a Scholar of the Leukemia Society of America and is supported by a Senior AIDS Fellowship from the Kaplan Cancer Center. Milayna Subar, M.D., and Margaret Dugan, M.D., are partially supported by NIH training grant CA09454.

▸Requests for reprints should be addressed to Daniel M. Knowles, M.D.; Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Department of Pathology, 630 W. 168th Street; New York, NY 10032.


New York, New York; and Berkeley, California


© 1988 American College of PhysiciansAmerican College of Physicians


Ann Intern Med. 1988;108(5):744-753. doi:10.7326/0003-4819-108-5-744
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We identified 105 patients with lymphoid neoplasia associated with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) at the New York University Medical Center from 1981 through 1986: 89 had non-Hodgkin lymphoma; 13, Hodgkin disease; and 3, chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Immunophenotypic and antigen receptor gene rearrangement analysis showed the B-cell origin of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas studied and the clonal suppressorcytotoxic T-cell subset origin of the chronic lymphocytic leukemias. We classified 69% of the non-Hodgkin lymphomas as high grade (small, noncleaved and large cell, immunoblastic-plasmacytoid) and 31% as intermediate grade (diffuse large cell). Each histopathologic category was correlated with distinct clinical features, including a statistically significant difference in median survival. Patients with Hodgkin disease had an atypical, aggressive clinical course, whereas patients with T-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia had an indolent clinical course. These studies show the clinical, morphologic, and immunophenotypic spectrum of AIDS-associated lymphoid neoplasia, that the natural history of Hodgkin disease is altered in patients with AIDS, and support the Centers For Disease Control's recent revision in diagnostic criteria for AIDS to include intermediate-grade diffuse, aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphomas occurring in patients seropositive for human immunodeficiency virus.

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