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Medicine and Public Policy |

Increasing Utilization of Allogeneic Bone Marrow Transplantation: Results of the 1988-1990 Survey

Mortimer M. Bortin, MD; Mary M. Horowitz, MD; and Alfred A. Rimm, PhD
[+] Article and Author Information

Current Author Addresses: Drs. Bortin, Horowitz and Rimm: International Bone Marrow Transplant Registry, Medical College of Wisconsin, P.O. Box 26509, Milwaukee, WI 53226.

Grant Support: Supported by Public Health Service Grant POl-CA-40053 from the National Cancer Institute and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; and grants from Alpha Therapeutic Corporation; Armour Pharmaceutical Company; Bristol-Myers; Burroughs-Wellcome Company; Charles E. Culpeper Foundation; Cutter Biologicals Inc; Eleanor Naylor Dana Charitable Trust; Eppley Foundation for Research; Hoechst-Roussel Pharmaceuticals Inc; Immunex Corporation; Robert J. and Helen C. Kleberg Foundation; Eli Lilly and Company; Ambrose Monell Foundation; Noble Foundation; Ortho Biotech Corporation; John Oster Family Foundation, Inc., Elsa U. Pardee Foundation; RGK Foundation; Roerig Division of Pfizer Pharmaceuticals; Sandoz Research Institute; Stackner Family Foundation; Starr Foundation; Joan and Jack Stein Charities; Swiss Cancer League; Wyeth-Ayerst Research; and Xoma Corporation.


© 1992 American College of PhysiciansAmerican College of Physicians


Ann Intern Med. 1992;116(6):505-512. doi:10.7326/0003-4819-116-6-505
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Objective: To determine the pattern and frequency of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation from related and unrelated donors from 1988 to 1990.

Design and Setting: Survey of 342 institutions in 47 countries.

Measurements: Numbers of patients receiving bone marrow transplantation for specific disease categories at institutions with active allogeneic bone marrow transplant programs.

Main Results: Patients (14 745) received allogeneic bone marrow transplantation between 1988 and 1990; of these, 1153 (8%) were from unrelated donors. Reasons for transplantation were acute leukemia (47%), chronic myelogenous leukemia (27%), lymphoma and other malignancies (10%), severe aplastic anemia (9%), and other nonmalignant diseases (7%). The number of allogeneic bone marrow transplants per million persons differed among countries, averaging 7.7 per million in North America and 5.7 per million in western Europe.

Conclusions: The use of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation continued to increase at a rate of more than 600 additional patients and 25 new transplant teams annually. This rise is due in part to increasing use of unrelated volunteers as donors. Resources allocated for transplants vary widely among countries.

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