0

The full content of Annals is available to subscribers

Subscribe/Learn More  >
Articles |

Prognostic Value of Treadmill Exercise Testing in Elderly Persons

Tauqir Y. Goraya, MD, PhD; Steven J. Jacobsen, MD, PhD; Patricia A. Pellikka, MD; Todd D. Miller, MD; Akbar Khan; Susan A. Weston, MS; Bernard J. Gersh, MB, ChB, DPhil; and Véronique L. Roger, MD, MPH
[+] Article and Author Information

From the Mayo Clinic and Mayo Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota.


Acknowledgments: The authors thank Jeannie Hill and Susan Stotz for assistance with data collection, Jill Killian and Erin Green for assistance with statistical analysis, and Kristie Shorter for secretarial assistance.

Grant Support: In part by research grants from the American Heart Association National Center (93-1325 and 96-1358) and a grant from the Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health (AR30582).

Requests for Single Reprints: Tauqir Y. Goraya, MD, PhD, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905.

Requests To Purchase Bulk Reprints (minimum, 100 copies): the Reprints Coordinator; phone, 215-351-2657; e-mail, reprints@mail.acponline.org.

Current Author Addresses: Drs. Goraya, Pellikka, Miller, Gersh, and Roger: Division of Cardiovascular Diseases and Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905.

Dr. Jacobsen: Section of Clinical Epidemiology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905.

Mr. Khan: Tulane University School of Medicine, 1430 Tulane Avenue, New Orleans, LA 70112-2699.

Ms. Weston: Section of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905.

Author Contributions: Conception and design: T.Y. Goraya, S.J. Jacobsen, V.L. Roger.

Analysis and interpretation of the data: T.Y. Goraya, S.J. Jacobsen, P.A. Pellikka, T.D. Miller, B.J. Gersh, V.L. Roger.

Drafting of the article: T.Y. Goraya, S.J. Jacobsen, V.L. Roger.

Critical revision of the article for important intellectual content: T.Y. Goraya, S.J. Jacobsen, P.A. Pellikka, T.D. Miller, B.J. Gersh, V.L. Roger.

Final approval of the article: T.Y. Goraya, S.J. Jacobsen, A. Khan, V.L. Roger.

Provision of study materials or patients: P.A. Pellikka, T.D. Miller, B.J. Gersh, V.L. Roger.

Statistical expertise: T.Y. Goraya, S.J. Jacobsen, S.A. Weston, V.L. Roger.

Obtaining of funding: V.L. Roger.

Administrative, technical, or logistic support: A. Khan, V.L. Roger.

Collection and assembly of data: T.Y. Goraya, A. Khan, V.L. Roger.


Ann Intern Med. 2000;132(11):862-870. doi:10.7326/0003-4819-132-11-200006060-00003
Text Size: A A A

Over the past three decades, vital statistics data have shown a great decrease in age-adjusted mortality due to heart disease (1). However, this decrease reflects a shift in the disease burden toward the older segments of the population, and heart disease remains the leading cause of death in the United States (24). Treadmill exercise testing is widely used to evaluate coronary artery disease. More than 800 000 treadmill exercise tests are performed in the U.S. Medicare population each year (5), of which one third are conducted by noncardiologists. Despite widespread use of treadmill exercise testing in elderly persons, the prognostic value of such testing in these persons has not been fully characterized (5).

First Page Preview

View Large
/>
First page PDF preview

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1.
Frequency distribution of workload achieved by age group.

White bars represent patients younger than 65 years of age; striped bars represent patients 65 years of age or older. MET = metabolic equivalent.

Grahic Jump Location
Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2.
Kaplan–Meier survival curves for overall mortality and cardiac event–free survival among study patients, stratified by functional aerobic capacity.dotted linedashed linesolid lineTop.top lefttop rightPBottom.bottom leftbottom rightP

Patients were stratified into three exercise capacity categories: ≥ 85% functional aerobic capacity ( ), 50% to 84% functional aerobic capacity ( ), and <50% functional aerobic capacity ( ). Survival curves for overall mortality among persons younger than 65 years of age ( ) and those 65 years of age or older ( ). The log-rank test detected significant differences among the three functional aerobic capacity categories for both age groups ( < 0.001). Curves for cardiac event–free survival among persons younger than 65 years of age ( ) and those 65 years of age or older ( ). The log-rank test detected significant differences among the three functional aerobic capacity categories for both age groups ( < 0.001).

Grahic Jump Location

Tables

References

Letters

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Comments

Submit a Comment
Submit a Comment

Summary for Patients

Exercise Testing in Patients 65 Years of Age and Older

The summary below is from the full report titled “Prognostic Value of Treadmill Exercise Testing in Elderly Persons.” It is in the 6 June 2000 issue of Annals of Internal Medicine (volume 132, pages 862-870). The authors are T.Y. Goraya, S.J. Jacobsen, P.A. Pellikka, T.D. Miller, A. Khan, S.A. Weston, B.J. Gersh, and V.L. Roger.

Read More...

Clinical Slide Sets

Terms of Use

The In the Clinic® slide sets are owned and copyrighted by the American College of Physicians (ACP). All text, graphics, trademarks, and other intellectual property incorporated into the slide sets remain the sole and exclusive property of the ACP. The slide sets may be used only by the person who downloads or purchases them and only for the purpose of presenting them during not-for-profit educational activities. Users may incorporate the entire slide set or selected individual slides into their own teaching presentations but may not alter the content of the slides in any way or remove the ACP copyright notice. Users may make print copies for use as hand-outs for the audience the user is personally addressing but may not otherwise reproduce or distribute the slides by any means or media, including but not limited to sending them as e-mail attachments, posting them on Internet or Intranet sites, publishing them in meeting proceedings, or making them available for sale or distribution in any unauthorized form, without the express written permission of the ACP. Unauthorized use of the In the Clinic slide sets will constitute copyright infringement.

Toolkit

Buy Now

to gain full access to the content and tools.

Want to Subscribe?

Learn more about subscription options

Advertisement
Related Articles
Related Point of Care
Topic Collections
PubMed Articles

Buy Now

to gain full access to the content and tools.

Want to Subscribe?

Learn more about subscription options

Forgot your password?
Enter your username and email address. We'll send you a reminder to the email address on record.
(Required)
(Required)