0

The full content of Annals is available to subscribers

Subscribe/Learn More  >
Articles |

Predictors of Virologic and Clinical Outcomes in HIV-1–Infected Patients Receiving Concurrent Treatment with Indinavir, Zidovudine, and Lamivudine: AIDS Clinical Trials Group Protocol 320

Lisa M. Demeter, MD; Michael D. Hughes, PhD; Robert W. Coombs, MD, PhD; J. Brooks Jackson, MD; Janet M. Grimes, MS; Ronald J. Bosch, PhD; Susan A. Fiscus, PhD; Stephen A. Spector, MD; Kathleen E. Squires, MD; Margaret A. Fischl, MD; and Scott M. Hammer, MD
[+] Article and Author Information

From University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York; Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts; University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland; University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina; University of California, San Diego, California; University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama; University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Florida; and Columbia University, New York, New York.


Note: Drs. Demeter and Hughes contributed equally to this work.

Disclosures: Dr. Demeter has received research support from Merck & Co. and Pharmacia-Upjohn and research support and honoraria from Glaxo Wellcome and Roche Molecular Systems and has served as a consultant to Glaxo Wellcome, Roche Pharmaceuticals, and Roche Molecular Systems. Dr. Hughes has received research support from Roche Pharmaceuticals and served as a consultant to Chiron. Dr. Jackson received an honorarium from Glaxo Wellcome. Dr. Fiscus has received research support from Glaxo Wellcome, Organon Technika, and Visible Genetics. Dr. Squires has received research support from Merck & Co., Abbott Laboratories, Agouron Pharmaceuticals, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Glaxo Wellcome, Gilead Sciences, Systemix, and Oxo-Chemie and has served as a consultant to Merck & Co., Bristol-Myers Squibb, Roxane, and Vertex. Dr. Fischl has received research support from Abbot Laboratories, Bristol-Myers Squibb, and Dupont and research support and honoraria from Agouron Pharmaceuticals, Glaxo Wellcome, and Merck & Co. and has served as an advisory board member to Bristol-Myers Squibb and Glaxo Wellcome.

Acknowledgments: The authors thank the patients and investigators at the 33 AIDS Clinical Trials units and 7 National Hemophilia Foundation sites, whose participation made this study possible. They also thank Luis Berrios, Michael Chiulli, and Robin Shepard for performance of HIV-1 RNA assays.

Grant Support: In part by the AIDS Clinical Trials Group and grants (AI-27658, AI-38855, AI-38858 [contracts 96VC006, 96VC009, 96VC010], AI-27664, AI-30731, RR-00044) from the U.S. National Institutes of Health. Supplemental support for some virology studies was provided by Merck & Co. and Roche Molecular Systems. Study medications were provided by Merck & Co. and Glaxo Wellcome.

Requests for Single Reprints: Lisa M. Demeter, MD, Infectious Diseases Unit, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 689, Rochester, NY 14642.

Current Author Addresses: Dr. Demeter: Infectious Diseases Unit, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 689, Rochester, NY 14642.

Drs. Hughes and Bosch: Harvard School of Public Health, 651 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115.

Dr. Jackson: Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins University, 600 North Wolfe Street, Carnegie 420, Baltimore, MD 21287.

Dr. Coombs: Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of Washington, 1959 Northeast Pacific Avenue, Room NW 120, Seattle, WA 98195.

Ms. Grimes: Brown University, Box G8063, Providence, RI 02906.

Dr. Fiscus: Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, 709 Mary Ellen Jones Building, Campus Box 7140, Chapel Hill, NC 27599.

Dr. Spector: Department of Pediatrics, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, Room 430, La Jolla, CA 92093.

Dr. Squires: Los Angeles County University of Southern California Medical Center, Rand Schrader Clinic, 1300 North Mission Road, Room 349, Los Angeles, CA 90033.

Dr. Fischl: Department of Medicine, University of Miami School of Medicine, 1800 Northwest 10th Avenue, Box 016960 (R-60A), Miami, FL 33101.

Dr. Hammer: Division of Infectious Diseases, Columbia University, 630 West 168th Street, Mail Box 82, Room PH8-W876, New York, NY 10032.

Author Contributions: Conception and design: L.M. Demeter, M.D. Hughes, R.W. Coombs, S.A. Spector, M.A. Fischl, S.M. Hammer.

Analysis and interpretation of the data: L.M. Demeter, M.D. Hughes, J.M. Grimes, R.J. Bosch, S.A. Spector, M.A. Fischl, S.M. Hammer.

Drafting of the article: L.M. Demeter, M.D. Hughes, R.J. Bosch, S.A. Spector, M.A. Fischl, S.M. Hammer.

Critical revision of the article for important intellectual content: L.M. Demeter, M.D. Hughes, R.W. Coombs, J.B. Jackson, R.J. Bosch, S.A. Spector, K.E. Squires, M.A. Fischl, S.M. Hammer.

Final approval of the article: L.M. Demeter, M.D. Hughes, R.J. Bosch, S.A. Fiscus, S.A. Spector, K.E. Squires, M.A. Fischl, S.M. Hammer.

Provision of study materials or patients: J.B. Jackson, S.A. Spector, K.E. Squires, M.A. Fischl, S.M. Hammer.

Statistical expertise: M.D. Hughes, J.M. Grimes, R.J. Bosch.

Administrative, technical, or logistic support: M.D. Hughes, R.W. Coombs, J.B. Jackson, S.A. Fiscus, S.M. Hammer.

Collection and assembly of data: L.M. Demeter, M.D. Hughes, R.W. Coombs, J.M. Grimes, S.A. Spector, M.A. Fischl, S.M. Hammer.


Ann Intern Med. 2001;135(11):954-964. doi:10.7326/0003-4819-135-11-200112040-00007
Text Size: A A A

Potent antiretroviral regimens lead to viral load suppression in 60% to 90% of patients with HIV-1 infection (16). Several studies have analyzed early plasma HIV-1 RNA level and CD4 cell count as predictors of response to antiretroviral therapy (711). Few patients in these studies received protease inhibitors or achieved virologic suppression. To design maximally effective treatment strategies for patients with HIV-1 infection, more information is needed regarding factors that predict response to regimens that more closely reflect current standards of care (1213). We report factors that predicted virologic and clinical responses to treatment with indinavir, zidovudine, and lamivudine in a phase III clinical trial.

First Page Preview

View Large
First page PDF preview

Figures

Tables

References

Letters

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Comments

Submit a Comment
Submit a Comment

Summary for Patients

Predictors of Outcomes in Patients with HIV Infection Treated with Indinavir, Zidovudine, and Lamivudine

The summary below is from the full report titled “Predictors of Virologic and Clinical Outcomes in HIV-1–Infected Patients Receiving Concurrent Treatment with Indinavir, Zidovudine, and Lamivudine. AIDS Clinical Trials Group Protocol 320.” It is in the 4 December 2001 issue of Annals of Internal Medicine (volume 135, pages 954-964). The authors are LM Demeter, MD Hughes, RW Coombs, JB Jackson, JM Grimes, RJ Bosch, SA Fiscus, SA Spector, KE Squires, MA Fischl, and SM Hammer.

Read More...

Clinical Slide Sets

Terms of Use

The In the Clinic® slide sets are owned and copyrighted by the American College of Physicians (ACP). All text, graphics, trademarks, and other intellectual property incorporated into the slide sets remain the sole and exclusive property of the ACP. The slide sets may be used only by the person who downloads or purchases them and only for the purpose of presenting them during not-for-profit educational activities. Users may incorporate the entire slide set or selected individual slides into their own teaching presentations but may not alter the content of the slides in any way or remove the ACP copyright notice. Users may make print copies for use as hand-outs for the audience the user is personally addressing but may not otherwise reproduce or distribute the slides by any means or media, including but not limited to sending them as e-mail attachments, posting them on Internet or Intranet sites, publishing them in meeting proceedings, or making them available for sale or distribution in any unauthorized form, without the express written permission of the ACP. Unauthorized use of the In the Clinic slide sets will constitute copyright infringement.

Toolkit

Buy Now

to gain full access to the content and tools.

Want to Subscribe?

Learn more about subscription options

Advertisement
Related Articles
Topic Collections
PubMed Articles
Forgot your password?
Enter your username and email address. We'll send you a reminder to the email address on record.
(Required)
(Required)