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Visceral Adiposity Is an Independent Predictor of Incident Hypertension in Japanese Americans

Tomoshige Hayashi, MD, PhD; Edward J. Boyko, MD, MPH; Donna L. Leonetti, PhD; Marguerite J. McNeely, MD, MPH; Laura Newell-Morris, PhD; Steven E. Kahn, MB, ChB; and Wilfred Y. Fujimoto, MD
[+] Article and Author Information

From Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System and the University of Washington, Seattle, Washington.


Acknowledgment: The authors thank staff members, especially Jane Shofer, for skilled assistance. They also thank the King County Japanese-American Community for support and cooperation.

Grant Support: By National Institutes of Health grants DK-31170, HL-49293, and DK-02654; by facilities and services provided by the Diabetes and Endocrinology Research Center (grant DK-17047), Clinical Nutrition Research Unit (grant DK-35816), and the General Clinical Research Center (grant RR-00037) at the University of Washington; and by the Medical Research Service and Cooperative Studies Program of the Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, Washington.

Potential Financial Conflicts of Interest: None disclosed.

Requests for Single Reprints: Edward J. Boyko, MD, MPH, Epidemiologic Research and Information Center, Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System (S-152E), 1660 South Columbian Way, Seattle, WA 98108; e-mail, eboyko@u.washington.edu.

Current Author Addresses: Drs. Hayashi and Boyko: Epidemiologic Research and Information Center, Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System, (S-152E), 1660 South Columbian Way, Seattle, WA 98108.

Drs. Leonetti and Newell-Morris: Department of Anthropology, University of Washington, Box 353100, Seattle, WA 98195-3100.

Dr. McNeely: Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Box 354981, 4311 11th Avenue Northeast, Suite 230, Seattle, WA 98105-4608.

Dr. Kahn: Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology and Nutrition, Department of Medicine, Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System (151) and University of Washington, 1660 South Columbian Way, Seattle, WA 98108.

Dr. Fujimoto: Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology and Nutrition, Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Box 356426, 1959 Northeast Pacific Street, Seattle, WA 98195-6426.

Author Contributions: Conception and design: T. Hayashi, E.J. Boyko, D.L. Leonetti, M.J. McNeely, L. Newell-Morris, S.E. Kahn, W.Y. Fujimoto.

Analysis and interpretation of the data: T. Hayashi, E.J. Boyko, S.E. Kahn.

Drafting of the article: T. Hayashi, E.J. Boyko, S.E. Kahn.

Critical revision of the article for important intellectual content: T. Hayashi, E.J. Boyko, M.J. McNeely, L. Newell-Morris, S.E. Kahn, W.Y. Fujimoto.

Final approval of the article: T. Hayashi, E.J. Boyko, D.L. Leonetti, M.J. McNeely, L. Newell-Morris, S.E. Kahn, W.Y. Fujimoto.

Provision of study materials or patients: E.J. Boyko, D.L. Leonetti.

Statistical expertise: T. Hayashi, E.J. Boyko.

Obtaining of funding: E.J. Boyko, D.L. Leonetti, L. Newell-Morris, W.Y. Fujimoto.

Administrative, technical, or logistic support: E.J. Boyko, D.L. Leonetti.

Collection and assembly of data: D.L. Leonetti, M.J. McNeely.


Ann Intern Med. 2004;140(12):992-1000. doi:10.7326/0003-4819-140-12-200406150-00008
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Among the 300 eligible men and women followed for 10 to 11 years, there were 92 incident cases of hypertension. In univariate logistic regression analysis, intra-abdominal fat area, abdominal subcutaneous fat area, total subcutaneous fat area, total fat area, BMI, and waist circumference were associated with a higher incidence of hypertension. Fasting plasma insulin level, fasting plasma glucose level, 2-hour plasma glucose level, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level were also associated with incidence of hypertension (Table 1). Wealso compared the baseline characteristics of participants included in the present analyses (Table 1) with baseline characteristics of persons with inadequate follow-up (data not shown). Baseline characteristics by follow-up status did not differ significantly, except that participants who completed follow-up had on average slightly higher diastolic blood pressure than those who missed a follow-up examination (73.4 mm Hg vs. 71.4 mm Hg; P = 0.047).

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Grahic Jump Location
Figure.
Flow of participants through the study.

*Of the 59 participants with hypertension at the 5- to 6-year examination, 2 died and 8 were lost to follow-up before the 10- to 11-year examination.

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Summary for Patients

Fat Content Inside the Abdomen Helps Predict Whether Japanese Americans Develop Hypertension

The summary below is from the full report titled “Visceral Adiposity Is an Independent Predictor of Incident Hypertension in Japanese Americans.” It is in the 15 June 2004 issue of Annals of Internal Medicine (volume 140, pages 992-1000). The authors are T. Hayashi, E.J. Boyko, D.L. Leonetti, M.J. McNeely, L. Newell-Morris, S.E. Kahn, and W.Y. Fujimoto.

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